BUSINESS SCHOOL

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Stanford Graduate School of Business | Stanford, California

A few months ago, I was accepted into the deferred enrollment program at the Stanford Graduate School of Business (Stanford GSB) and the 2+2 Program at Harvard Business School (HBS).

For context, these deferred MBA programs are simply another route to the MBA program where “high potential” students in their final year of undergrad or a master’s program are offered early admission to the business school with the flexibility to work for 2–4 years before matriculating. …

REFLECTIONS

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Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

I originally wrote and dumped this in my journal, but after being encouraged on Twitter, I thought I’d put it here because…why not?

To make it more public-friendly, I’ve adapted it a bit; mostly to provide additional context and add external links.

I’m curious to hear your thoughts on this when you’re done reading.

I woke up yesterday morning to a tweet by Tinashe (one of my ALU classmates) that pointed to a TED talk by CNN’s Van Jones where he highlighted how, based on loopholes in the US constitution, Donald Trump could be sworn in as president of the United States despite having lost the election. …

ACADEMICS

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Photo by Dan Dimmock on Unsplash

I’m writing this piece in response to a question I’ve been asked way too many times by business students at my university who are currently going through what I can best describe as hell.

I felt that instead of having to continue giving the same answer to many different students who reach out to me, it’ll be best to write it all out so that everyone and anyone can have access to my answer to a question I’ve had to answer one too many times.

The question I get asked is always some version of: “Arinze, how were you able to write your 10000-word dissertation in just 10 weeks and still score an 80? …

EFFECTIVE READING HACKS • PART 2

The superpower of reading journals is their ability to engage your metacognitive skills as you critically reflect on books you’ve read.

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I’ve been in love with books for such a long time. Growing up, they were my closest friends as I spent most of my time indoors and alone. Books helped me learn more about myself and the world — two very confusing entities.

I love(d) reading! But I fell out of love after a while because I didn’t see the point in reading if I couldn’t remember half of what I read a few months after finishing a book. My poor retention was ruining my relationship with books.

Things got slightly better when I started using active reading techniques like highlighting key sentences and taking notes in the margins of books. They helped me understand the book more thoroughly while I was reading it and sustained my retention for maybe a few more days than usual. …

DESIGNER SPOTLIGHT #4

Photo cover for article. A greyscale photo Tolu Olubode in a hoodie; he’s sitting out in the sun, smiling, and has shades on.
Photo cover for article. A greyscale photo Tolu Olubode in a hoodie; he’s sitting out in the sun, smiling, and has shades on.

Born and raised in Lagos, Nigeria, Tolu Olubode is a digital product designer currently living in Toronto, Canada. He is currently a Software Engineering student at the University of Ottawa. While he’s currently an incoming design intern at Quora, he has previously worked at Facebook, and at several startups and design agencies. Tolu is passionate about blazing new paths for black people in design. In his spare time, he loves to shuffle and acquire side projects and tinker with new business ideas. …

EFFECTIVE READING HACKS • PART 1

I found a way to stop wasting my time reading trashy books

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Photo by Kenny Luo on Unsplash

Time and attention are two of our most precious resources. What makes them so is the fact that they are painfully finite. There’s only so much of them to go around. If you’re anything like me, there’s nothing more infuriating than the feeling of having wasted your time and attention on an activity that should have been worthwhile, like reading a book.

We mostly read books for two reasons: entertainment or education. The latter could be formal education or self-education. Either way, we expect the books we read to add some value to us. …

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If you’re having a virtual internship this summer/fall, congratulations! While this internship format might not be what you expected, most of your peers have had their offers rescinded so you’re really lucky to be part of the small group of students whose work plans for the 2020 summer/fall cycles are still intact.

Having recognised that most of you are going into an unusual internship structure this year, my friends (listed at the bottom of this article) and I have taken the time to outline some strategies that you can employ to still get that full-time offer at the end of your internship (assuming this is available at the company where you’re interning). …

several hands placed on top of one another to show teamwork and community
several hands placed on top of one another to show teamwork and community
Photo by Perry Grone on Unsplash

The journey towards becoming a designer or growing as a designer is one that takes a village. It’s akin to the famous African proverb that says: “If you want to go fast, go alone; but if you want to go far, go together.”

Whether you’re new to product design or you’re an experienced designer, interacting with a community of other designers provides an opportunity to learn from a wide pool of fellow designers, while expanding your network of fellow practitioners to reach out to whenever you have a question or need some sort of design guidance.

The only thing more important than finding a community is finding the right community for you. In choosing which community to join, think about the communities that allow you to bring your whole self to the table and are keen to support people of the same background as you. Such communities often prove to be the most useful in the short- and long-term. …

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Photo by jose aljovin on Unsplash

Learning is an inextricable part of the human experience. Every action we can perform, every word we can speak, every quick fact we can regurgitate was learnt at some point in our lives whether intentionally or subconsciously. Learning is, in fact, a Darwinian phenomenon as it is considered a prerequisite for the survival of any species.

In our case, we learn for a number of different reasons: to stay relevant, to become smarter, or to simply avoid being rendered obsolete. But, as we grow older, our ability to learn diminishes in varying degrees of severity. We find it harder to pick up new skills, to learn a new language, or to learn a new concept. …

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Photo by Adrian Trinkaus on Unsplash

Allow me to begin by letting you in on something. Here’s the thing: I think of myself as a complete idiot 80% of the time and an impostor during the remaining 20%. You see, I’m not the smartest of people but my ambition covers that up.

It is that ambition, more so than my intelligence, that has propelled me to heights I never saw reachable. With the next few paragraphs, I’ll share with you the source of that ambition, describe the uniqueness of that kind of ambition, and hope that you can develop that kind of ambition for yourself.

Let’s start with a short tale, shall we? This tale is important. …

About

Arinze Obiezue

Content Designer at Facebook • Incoming Stanford MBA • ALU ’20 • Co-founder at EarlyAdmit & Designish

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